Mirjam Eladhari: Computer Games as Cultural Property

Filed under: Guest Lectures in November 16, 2010, by Ulf Benjaminsson. Print This

Games such as Senet (3500 BC) and Chess (1000 AD) reflect societal structures and values from human history. What can current games teach us about ourselves, our culture and the society we are part of?

Construction of rule systems for games can be used to illustrate and better understand complex processes. At a societal level it can be about war and peace, on group level about processes such as stigmatisation and bullying, while an individual level it can be about issues of identity. When using games as a form of culture we can temporarily step out of our every day roles and study the processes we are part of by abstracting them to systems. As we step back into our roles we can do so with increased understanding for ourselves and others – we have seen how the structures we live in affect how we act, and how others act towards us.

Join in for a journey that starts in Egypt five thousand years ago, leading to the latest research in games.

This talk is open to the public!

Time: Thursday, November 25th, 19:00
Location: E22